OLIVER LARIC
PHOTOPLASTIK
Secession, Vienna
22 April - 19 June 2016

PRESS RELEASE

Oliver Laric’s exhibition Photoplastik transforms the Secession’s main hall into a sculptural grand assembly, bringing together works across the ages from antiquity to the present. Most of the 3D-printed objects bear a close relationship to Vienna, where Laric took his 3D scanner to public settings as well as renowned institutions including the Kunsthistorisches Museum, the Albertina, and the University of Vienna’s Institute of Classical Archaeology to digitize a large number of objects.

The selection is informed by Laric’s current research into the history and development of 3D technology as well as the increasingly heated contentions over authorship in the digital age: in today’s Internet culture, where content and information circulate and are recycled beyond anyone’s control, anarchic structures effectively render the notion of singular authorship moot. That is why a vital component of his show will be installed not in the gallery but online: Laric makes the 3D data derived from the objects on display as well as many others he scanned as part of the preparations for the exhibition available for free download.

The question of copyright and the public domain has long been a central concern for Oliver Laric, who has been negotiating with collections and museums—especially public ones—to provide unrestricted access to their holdings. Many of his works broach issues under debate in contemporary discourses in cultural and visual studies and he considers digital forms of reproduction and dissemination as organic extensions of their analog predecessors photography, film, and sculpture.

The exhibition’s title refers to Eduard Kuchinka’s book Die Photoplastik: Herstellung photographischer Skulpturen und Reliefs und ähnliche Verfahren (Photoplastics: The Manufacture of Photographic Sculptures and Reliefs and Similar Processes, 1926). Mentioned in it is François Willème, a French artist who, in 1860, took out a patent on a precursor of today’s 3D scan technology and who also left his mark in Vienna.

An artist’s book designed by Oliver Laric will be published in conjunction with the exhibition.

Oliver Laric
Installation view, 'Photoplastik', Secession, 2016
Photo: Iris Ranzinger



Oliver Laric
Installation view, 'Photoplastik', Secession, 2016
Photo: Iris Ranzinger



Oliver Laric
Installation view, 'Photoplastik', Secession, 2016
Photo: Iris Ranzinger



Oliver Laric
Installation view, 'Photoplastik', Secession, 2016
Photo: Iris Ranzinger



Oliver Laric
Installation view, 'Photoplastik', Secession, 2016
Photo: Iris Ranzinger



Oliver Laric
Installation view, 'Photoplastik', Secession, 2016
Photo: Iris Ranzinger



Oliver Laric
Installation view, 'Photoplastik', Secession, 2016
Photo: Iris Ranzinger



Oliver Laric
Installation view, 'Photoplastik', Secession, 2016
Photo: Iris Ranzinger



Oliver Laric
Installation view, 'Photoplastik', Secession, 2016
Photo: Iris Ranzinger



Oliver Laric at the Archaeological Collection of the Institute of Classical Archeology at the University of Vienna, November 2015
Photo: Iris Ranzinger



Oliver Laric at the Archaeological Collection of the Institute of Classical Archeology at the University of Vienna, November 2015
Photo: Iris Ranzinger



Oliver Laric at the Kunsthistorisches Museum Wien, January 2016
Photo: Iris Ranzinger