DOUGLAS GORDON
In his most well-known works - in video, photography, and sculpture - Scottish artist Douglas Gordon (b. 1966) explores such universal dualities as life and death or good and evil.  Focusing on the familiarity and popularity of moving pictures Gordon manipulates, reframes, and superimposes them to alter viewers' perceptions.

Ricard Hamilton and I go way back. At least as far as I can remember. I first saw his work at the fruitmarket gallery in Edinburgh, 1988. It was one of the most  explicitly political exhibitions I had seen, as a student during the ‘thatcher years’ in the u.k. Next time we met was in Derry/Londonderry at the Orchard gallery, later the same year; it was the first time I heard Hamilton talk in depth about the process of printmaking and the mechanical reproduction of images. The pictures I saw were of ‘the citizen’, ‘fin mccool’ and the Ulysses etchings.

Over the next years we bumped into one another, mechanically. I often played with the idea of the ideas of Hamilton.

I once saw that he carried a polaroid camera with him. I never saw him use the camera. I often saw him ask someone to take a photograph of him, using his own camera. I wish I had thought of that idea, I thought.

I still wish I had thought of that idea, I think.

One day, he asked me to take a picture of him.

I was perplexed and unable to do anything.

I thought about my indecision for quite some time.

Once again, last year, in Edinburgh, I was presented with the opportunity to take a photograph of Richard. Yet again, I was unable to do so.

I handed the camera to my son and asked him to take the photograph.
- Douglas Gordon

Douglas Gordon's 'BLOW-UP (temporary portrait of a father, channeled through a son, using means to hand)', a Giclée Photo Print, is an edition of 13 (+2 AP); dimensions: 140 x 112 cm. In cooperation with Gagosian Gallery.


Douglas Gordon
'BLOW-UP (temporary portrait of a father,
channeled through a son, using means to hand)'
2008
Giclée Photo Print; 140 x 112 cm
Edition of 13 + 2 AP
In cooperation with Gagosian Gallery
GORDON-2008-0001